Wasting Even More Time

"art", behind-the-scenes stuff for Waste of time, and reblogs

2 notes

Pick a hobby. Any hobby.

I am quite certain there is at least one anime where the characters’ entire lives revolve around that hobby.

This is in response to my mum challenging this claim by saying, “is there one about bellringing?” and I couldn’t find any. But there are THREE fishing anime. So it’s one all.

Filed under tsuritama super fisher grander musashi tsurikichi sampei

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Okay, I know that I’ve shown this sim on here already, but I think it’s important to mention that this is the first time I have EVER been able to make a sim that looks like the Dera I picture in my head while I’m writing him. Seriously, I mean people are ragging on the create a sim tool, and yeah, I’ll give you the limited clothes and hair options (yeah, like that was never a problem in previous games), but the actual face-sculpting is amazing aauugghh.
All right, I’m going to try not to spam you any more with sims stuff. Emphasis on try.

Okay, I know that I’ve shown this sim on here already, but I think it’s important to mention that this is the first time I have EVER been able to make a sim that looks like the Dera I picture in my head while I’m writing him. Seriously, I mean people are ragging on the create a sim tool, and yeah, I’ll give you the limited clothes and hair options (yeah, like that was never a problem in previous games), but the actual face-sculpting is amazing aauugghh.

All right, I’m going to try not to spam you any more with sims stuff. Emphasis on try.

Filed under the sims 4 dera

7,670 notes

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips — Asymmetry in facial expressions.A lot of times, asymmetry will bring energy and movement to a pose or composition. More specifically, I feel like breaking the symmetry of a character’s expression is key to bring interest to it. Of course, there’s always a situation where there’s a need for symmetry. On top of my head, I can think of depicting a character who has an authority role, or the “undefeated champion of something”, or the “cold stone killer”, etc. So, a symmetrical facial expression usually means the character is: supremely bored, supremely confident, has no emotions, has a poker face, or is dead. Did I miss one? Symmetry in framing is also quite rare, but when handled by a master (Kubrick, Anderson), it’s undeniable. (If you have time, watch this: http://vimeo.com/89302848)Now, back to asymmetry in facial expressions. In general, it’s a great way to flesh out a character’s thought process. What is he/she thinking about? What’s their goal?I’m just touching the tip of the iceberg here. Way more tips to come in the future. Maybe next time, I’ll start to cover GESTURES.Completely unrelated to the subject, I recently read a list of tips from movie director Sam Mendes. Here’s my favorite: “Try to learn to make the familiar strange, and the strange familiar. …”Norm

This is why all my characters have permanently cocked eyebrows.
Also it’s why Seth tips his head a lot (thought that’s actually largely because I enjoy drawing him wonky—it suits him).

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips — Asymmetry in facial expressions.

A lot of times, asymmetry will bring energy and movement to a pose or composition. More specifically, I feel like breaking the symmetry of a character’s expression is key to bring interest to it. Of course, there’s always a situation where there’s a need for symmetry. On top of my head, I can think of depicting a character who has an authority role, or the “undefeated champion of something”, or the “cold stone killer”, etc. So, a symmetrical facial expression usually means the character is: supremely bored, supremely confident, has no emotions, has a poker face, or is dead. Did I miss one? Symmetry in framing is also quite rare, but when handled by a master (Kubrick, Anderson), it’s undeniable. (If you have time, watch this: http://vimeo.com/89302848)

Now, back to asymmetry in facial expressions. In general, it’s a great way to flesh out a character’s thought process. What is he/she thinking about? What’s their goal?

I’m just touching the tip of the iceberg here. Way more tips to come in the future. Maybe next time, I’ll start to cover GESTURES.

Completely unrelated to the subject, I recently read a list of tips from movie director Sam Mendes. Here’s my favorite: “Try to learn to make the familiar strange, and the strange familiar. …”

Norm

This is why all my characters have permanently cocked eyebrows.

Also it’s why Seth tips his head a lot (thought that’s actually largely because I enjoy drawing him wonky—it suits him).

(via flipsidered)

Filed under grizandnorm